Gluten Free Graham Crackers

 

 

These graham crackers make a tasty snack on their own, and they are also sturdy enough to use for s’mores. They will stay fresh for several days in a sealed container on the counter.

 

They are baked similar to biscotti so that you get nice, crispy cookies, even if the dough is rolled out on the thick side. The crackers are baked and removed from the oven. The oven is turned off, and the crackers are returned to the still-warm oven to finish drying out. The original bake time will vary based on the actual thickness of your crackers, so keep a close eye on them.

 

This recipe is my favorite iteration, but some basic substitutions will still yield a tasty result. I made a version with no oat flour (increase flax seed to ½ cup and omit oatmeal), and you can also use all butter instead of a mix of butter and coconut oil. The sugar can also be adjusted to taste. You may need to adjust the amount of milk that you add to make a nice pliable dough.

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Fudgies… or No-Bake Cookies – A geographic and cultural debate!

gluten free fudgies

The proper name for these cookies is a matter of some debate in my household. My husband – and most of the country, as far as I can tell – calls these cookies “no-bake cookies.” In my family, these cookies go by one name and one name only – “fudgies”. My grandmother was a bona fide cookie lady for many years, making cookies at a high school cafeteria in Massachusetts. She called these fudgies, and I don’t know about you, but I’m not arguing with a cookie lady!

 

Another reason why these cookies should be called “fudgies” – you cook the base as you would cook a fudge candy. This is the reason why some people have difficulty with the cookies coming out dry and crumbly, or so soft that they never firm up. Most recipes specify a cooking time, which can vary from one to five minutes, and your results can vary wildly based on the size of the pot you use, or if you scale the recipe up or down. If you want to avoid dry or mushy fudgies, it’s time to haul out the candy thermometer. Fudge is cooked to 240ºF (soft ball stage), but I prefer to slightly undercook the sugar mixture to 220ºF. This results in a slightly creamier, glossier cookie.

 

Using a candy thermometer sounds like a pain, but you may only need to use it a few times, and you can record how long you needed to boil the sugar mixture. Just keep in mind that if you double or half the recipe, or use a different sized pot, your timing will probably change. A candy thermometer is the only way to guarantee consistent results every time.

 

Ingredient note: This recipe contains gluten free oats. Some people on gluten free diets cannot tolerate oats, even if they are certified gluten free. If you are sharing these cookies, please let any GF dieters know that they contain oats!

 

Yield: 30 cookies using #40 portion scoop

Ingredients:

  •  2 c. white sugar ( 400 g)
  • 1/4 c. cocoa powder (20 g)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 c. milk
  • 1/2 cup butter (1 stick or 114 g)
  • 1/2 c. peanut butter (140 g)
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  •  3 c. old fashioned gluten free oats (285 g)

Other Equipment:

  • parchment paper or waxed paper
  • cookie scoop
  • candy thermometer
  • 6 Qt pot
  • rubber spatula

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Oatmeal Flax Muffins

Gluten Free Oatmeal Flax Muffins - www.cookiesandquilts.com

 

These muffins pack in fiber and iron, and have a delicious cinnamon molasses taste.

 

This recipe use milled flax seed, not whole flax. Milled flax seed looks like this:

milled flax seed

Milled flax seed from Hodgson Mills

 

You can find milled flax seed in the health food flours sections of the grocery store. I purchase Hodgson Mill brand, which is labeled as gluten free.

 

Ingredient note: This recipe contains gluten free oats. Some people on gluten free diets cannot tolerate oats, even if they are certified gluten free. If you are sharing these muffins, please let any GF dieters know that they contain oats!

 

Yield: 10 muffins

 

Ingredients:

  •  1 c. certified gluten free oats (95 g)
  • 1 c. buttermilk

 

  • 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum
  • 1/3 c. white or brown rice flour (50 g)
  • 1/3 c. tapioca starch (35 g)
  • 1/3 c. potato starch (45 g)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 c. milled flax seed (26 g)
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 c. light brown sugar
  • 1/3 c. oil
  • 2 Tablespoons molasses
  • nonstick cooking spray
  • raw/turbinado sugar (optional)

 

Other Equipment:

  • 12 cup muffin pan

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